The Best Down Jackets for Men of 2018

Apr 22,  · The jackets with few features, lightweight fabric, and high fill-power down compressed the most, while the jackets with heavy and bulky face fabrics or low fill-power down .

We are also very particular about the length of the sleeves, as well as the shape of the jacket through the shoulders and upper back and chest. It also uses fill Nikwax hydrophobic down to prevent loss of loft due to water that has already managed to seep inside this jacket, providing the best overall defense against water available in a down jacket today.

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Apr 22,  · The jackets with few features, lightweight fabric, and high fill-power down compressed the most, while the jackets with heavy and bulky face fabrics or low fill-power down .
styles of Men's Down & Insulated Jackets from Marmot, The North Face, Helly Hansen, and more at Sierra Trading Post. Men Shop All Men's Clothing & Accessories. Activewear Jackets & Coats Winter Boots Sweaters Hats, Gloves & Scarves.
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Apr 22,  · The jackets with few features, lightweight fabric, and high fill-power down compressed the most, while the jackets with heavy and bulky face fabrics or low fill-power down .
Insulated & Down

Shop for men's The North Face jackets and coats designed with the athlete in mind combining style, comfort and performance like never before. MEN’S DOWN SIERRA JACKET. $ Compare For full-coverage during winter's worst, shield yourself in this weatherproof hooded parka that's insulated with responsibly sourced fill goose.

How does the Mountain Equipment Lightline compare to other cold weather jackets on this list? Comfy, durable, and well-priced for what you get. In many ways, the Transcendent is a less expensive version of the Patagonia Down Sweater above.

It provides solid warmth with 4. For , Outdoor Research updated the Transcendent with wider baffles, more down the older version had 3.

All told, we like the look of the new version, which is more modern and less tired while retaining all the basics that has made the jacket so popular. Lots of premium down. Heavy for a performance piece and the left-hand zip can take some getting used to. Most importantly, it packs in a ton of down—8.

It also has a tough 30D Pertex shell, which has a quality feel and good weather resistance. What are the downsides of the Neutrino Endurance? Second, Americans may have problems with the European-style left-hand zipper, which can take a while to get used to. These issues aside, the Rab is an exceptionally warm and comfortable winter piece. Large fit and a drop in build quality. As the name implies, this jacket uses premium fill down, which is much more packable and warm for the weight compared to the fill version.

The Magma also includes a soft-touch 15D Pertex Quantum shell, adjustable waist hem, and small interior zippered pocket—all features missing on the cheaper REI Co-op model. The Magma impressed us with the high quality down and materials, but falls short in a few key areas. Performs like a high-end down jacket but with better water resistance. A little heavy; poor cuff design. The Black Diamond Cold Forge breaks from tradition with a hybrid down and synthetic blend, but earns a spot on our list because it delivers what you want in a premium down jacket: The use of synthetics also means the Cold Forge will continue insulating when wet and dry much faster than pure down fill.

At 20 ounces, there are lighter and more packable options that deliver similar levels of warmth. Besides these minor complaints, the Cold Forge is a fantastic down piece, and the unique insulation is a major selling point for those in wet climates. More expensive and no warmer than the cheaper Rab Neutrino Endurance.

You get approximately 8 ounces grams of fill down along with a Pertex Quantum shell for moisture protection. It has some advanced features like a helmet-compatible hood, a two-way main zipper for belaying, and elasticized cuffs that do a good job staying out of your way during physical activity.

But the jacket still looks the part for city wear in the frigid months, making it a nice option for just about any type of winter use. Patagonia also offers a standard Fitz Roy jacket, but we recommend steering clear as it only has 4. Impressive warmth for the weight. Thin 7D shell is too fragile for our tastes. Montbell is at the forefront of lightweight warmth, and you will have a hard time finding down jackets with a better ratio of fill weight to total weight Western Mountaineering and Brooks Range are contenders.

The Mirage Parka weighs less than 13 ounces yet packs an impressive 5. What makes the Mirage Parka undesirable for generalists is the 7D shell, the thinnest on the list. This means that you really have to be careful when wearing the jacket for everything from avoiding snags on protruding twigs to tearing the shell on a climbing harness.

And if you are the careful type who babies their gear, go for it. But there is a sacrifice with this kind of warmth at this low of a weight, and that generally is a shortened lifespan for your jacket.

See the Men's Montbell Mirage Parka. Innovative design and very comfortable feel. Down jackets are known more for warmth than range of motion, but Mountain Hardwear is aiming for a game changer in this regard. The StretchDown line was launched a couple years ago, featuring a flexible polyester shell material with welded seams for comfort that is reminiscent of a synthetic layer. In our testing, however, it became clear that the jacket is not a backcountry piece.

Despite good looks and comfort, we found that the StretchDown falls short of the options above in terms of warmth to weight and packability. Where the StretchDown excels is as an everyday jacket. The knit shell fabric is very tough, and the clean styling wears well around the city even the logo is very understated.

Stylish design and burly shell fabric. Low quality down and expensive. As mentioned above, the Ovik Lite has a decidedly casual build that limits its appeal for backcountry use. Waterproof and very warm. Heavier and bulkier than a typical down jacket, which makes it less versatile. It features premium fill down, a fully waterproof 2-layer shell a rarity in the down jacket world , and nice touches like pit zips and a two-way front zipper to regulate heat.

As with the Magma above, REI does not provide the fill weight here, but the Stormhenge is one of the warmest options on this list. As a result, it lacks in versatility for uses like backpacking or climbing, but the waterproofing and warm build make it viable for everything from cold winter walks to downhill skiing. High-end look and feel. For commuting, urban use, and après-ski, the Lodge Jacket is a very attractive option. See the Men's Canada Goose Lodge.

Can feel drafty in cold conditions and the fit is a bit trim. At less than 7 ounces total, the SL is an ultralight jacket for fair-weather spring, summer, and fall backpacking trips, as well as a midlayer for winter sports. We recently took the new hoody version on a trekking and bikepacking adventure through Mongolia and came impressed with its packability and build quality.

Keep in mind that the Cerium SL does have its limitations. Given the meager 1. A casual piece from Marmot at a reasonable price point. Low fill power and sheds feathers. Marmot is known for outerwear, and rain jackets in particular. With fill down, it does have one of the lowest fill powers on this list competitors like the REI Co-op Down Jacket and Outdoor Research Transcendent use fill down. Aside from price, the Marmot Tullus is pretty bare bones. But if you can find it on sale, the Tullus is one of the cheaper down jackets available from a top brand.

Down Sweaters The down sweater is the most casual category of down jacket. But they perform well for everyday use, travel, light adventuring, and layering for winter sports. The temperature range for these jackets depends on factors like layering and exertion, but we find that down sweaters are suitable for approximately 35 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit 2 to 15 degrees Celsius.

Ultralight Down Jackets Ultralight down jackets are designed for backpacking, climbing, backcountry skiing, and other outdoor pursuits where every ounce matters. For unparalleled versatility on the trails, this 3-in-1 jacket system pairs a textured, waterproof, lined shell with a zip-out midweight hardface fleece for customizable insulation.

Wear both jackets together in cold, wet conditions or wear them separately as weather permits. Durable, lightweight three-in-one jacket for excellent range of motion and protection from the elements.

Wintertime treks are a blast with the customized coverage of this 3-in-1 jacket that combines a durable, waterproof outer shell with a removable, fill down insulated inner jacket. The exterior shell jacket features plenty of secure-zip pockets hold trail permits and pocket knives.

Underarm vents make sure you never overheat, and large front cargo pockets mean you can have ample chairlift snacks and a second pair of gloves readily available at all times. Avg Weight g 3 lbs 4. Beat your buddies down the hill in this lightweight and durable ski jacket crafted from two-layer Apex Flex material for nimble protection.

A removable, helmet-compatible hood offers customizable warmth, and a snap-away powder skirt keeps your base layers dry when you carve it up off-piste.

Insulated Waterproof Wind Protection Hooded. Standard fit jacket with a removable, helmet-compatible hood Snap-away powder skirt with gripper elastic Two secure-zip chest pockets Secure-zip hand pockets Internal media pocket with media port Internal goggle pocket Underarm vents Secure-zip wrist pocket with goggle wipe Waterproof, exposed zips Wrist gaiters with thumbholes. Avg Weight g 1 lb Your go-to jacket all season long, this versatile jacket system pairs a breathable, waterproof shell with a warm, insulated liner jacket.

Waterproof, insulated three-in-one ski jacket Standard Fit Removable, helmet-compatible hood Secure-zip chest and hand pockets Internal goggle pocket Underarm vents for added breathability Secure-zip wrist pocket with goggle wipe Zip-in integration [Inner] Secure-zip hand pockets.

Water-resistant, breathable, stretchy and ready to rock. For windy, cold weather activities, this coveted soft shell keeps you warm and windchill-free beneath its windproof exterior and comfortable fleece backer. Windproof stretch soft-shell jacket for cool-weather activities Relaxed fit Center front zipper, zip chest pocket and zip hand pockets Hem cinch-cord Raised logos. Designed for ultimate versatility in unpredictable conditions, an adjustable hood and pit-zip vents allow added ventilation in warmer weather.

Though thickness, loft, and method of construction have a lot to do with warmth, it's not only about fill quality and amounts. The design and features of a jacket, such as a hood and drawcords, the thickness and quality of the outer material, how well the jacket fits, etc. How well you keep the cold out is as important as how well you keep the heat inside.

To test these jackets for warmth we used them each countless times on adventures during the late fall and early winter: We also tested them side-by-side on a frigid, windy morning in the mountains to best tell how they compare against each other. Although they do not come with temperature ratings like sleeping bags, we feel these jackets offer good-to-adequate stand-alone warmth down to freezing and can help you stay warm in much lower temperatures used as part of a layering system.

However, in our testing, a few jackets stood out for their warmth. The Arc'teryx Cerium LT Hoody uses super high fill down to create a thick, cozy, and very lightweight jacket that was warmer than all the others. Likewise, the Rab Microlight Alpine provided top of the line warmth, in no small part because it did an excellent job of sealing off all the openings to keep the heat in and the cold out. Although not as good as those two jackets, the Patagonia Down Sweater Hoody was also among the most comfortably warm jackets in this review.

The higher, further, and steeper we take ourselves, the more important the weight of what we take becomes. The utility of an object comes in measuring how much use you get out of it for how much energy is expended carrying it. The warmth-to-weight ratio of a jacket is a key measure of value, and a down jacket has the highest warmth-to-weight ratio of any technical insulated jacket. Additional ounces are added or subtracted to a jacket's weight by the fabric and design features.

Frequently, durability and other critical features such as a hood are sacrificed on the altar of ultra-light design, to the detriment of the final product. An ultra-light jacket that doesn't keep you warm or that falls apart after limited use doesn't have a lot of value. To test weight, we weighed jackets on our scale as soon as they arrived.

In the cases where a contender came with an included stuff sack for compression, we included that in the item's overall weight, since weight tends to matter more when it's being carried than when it's being worn.

To find the best fit for our head tester, some of the jackets we ordered were size Large, while others were size Medium. Despite their differences in stated size, they all fit our head tester pretty much ideally, so we compared weights straight across the board, regardless of jacket size. From our testing, we noticed that weight seems to be a product of three factors: Using a higher fill-power down means that you get the same loft with less filling, so higher fill jackets tend to be lighter, and there is a little trade-off here except for added expense.

Similarly, using a thinner fabric can make a jacket lighter, with the compromise, in this case, being durability. Lastly, to save weight, some models have far fewer features, such as pockets, zippers, or draw cords, while others use much lighter and smaller zippers to shave half an ounce here and there.

The trade-off for using less or lighter features can again be durability in the case of super small gauge zippers or the lack of ability to fine-tune the fit if a jacket eschews the use of drawcords. The lightest jacket in this year's review was once again the Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer Hooded , which came in at 7.

Despite its low weight this jacket had a hood, zippered pockets, and a hem drawcord, and was surprisingly warm given how light it was. The insulating capacity of untreated down is almost completely negated by water, so jackets insulated with down have historically had a bad reputation in wet environments.

While a down jacket is never an excellent idea for a rainy day, having some level of water resistance is important simply to protect the down. All of the jackets reviewed accomplish this to some degree by applying a Durable Water Resistant DWR coating to the jacket. DWR coatings are chemical applications designed to repel water before it has a chance to be absorbed by the face fabric and, subsequently, the down inside.

By helping to keep the face fabric dry, DWR coatings allow a jacket to breathe better should moisture accumulate on the inside from sweating. The only downside to DWR coatings is that they vary widely in quality and durability. Once a DWR coating has worn off, you must reapply. Unfortunately, this can happen in as little as a few uses.

Water resistance can also come by using treated down that has a DWR coating. Because we do not have access to the down inside a jacket, we found it difficult to test how useful these DWR applications are at creating hydrophobic down. In years past we only reviewed a couple down jackets with hydrophobic down used inside, while this year there were four that made our selection of the ten best, suggesting that this is a technology that companies think improve the performance of down that comes in contact with water.

Never-the-less, despite soaking these jackets in the shower, we found it difficult to accurately compare the performance of the treated down versus regular down. In general, our scores in this metric were a reflection of the performance of the DWR coating and the face fabric, although we chose to award bonus points to jackets that used hydrophobic down. The most water resistant down jacket was, without doubt, the Columbia Outdry Ex Gold , specifically designed to be waterproof on the outside.

This model was like combining down insulation on the inside with a rain slicker on the outside, and while it came with a few drawbacks, water resistance certainly was not one of them.

While we can think of a few improvements we would make, we think this jacket is an intriguing start to the niche of waterproof down jackets. Our Top Pick for Wet Weather is the Rab Microlight Alpine , which combines water-resistant Pertex microlight shell fabric with an impressive DWR coating, Nikwax treated down, and a hood that keeps the rain out of your face.

While it wasn't wholly water proof , this is the down jacket we would want to take to wet climates, with the caveat that we would still do all we could to keep it as dry as possible. And with its combination of Q. Shield water resistant down and a durable and high-quality outer DWR coating, the Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer Hooded also received high scores for water resistance. This metric accounted for 15 percent of a product's final score.

Unlike heavy overcoat-style down parkas, these mid- and lightweight down jackets are designed to be worn while you recreate. Whether you wear them over the top of your other clothes, or as a warmth layer underneath a shell jacket, the fit needs to be conducive to movement. For this reason, we prefer jackets that are sleeker fitting and not excessively baggy, although your specific body type will dictate what constitutes a good fit. For us, an ideally fitting jacket is one that mimics the shape of the body, so that it moves as we do, but is also large enough to wear a layer or two beneath.

We try to avoid jackets that are overly baggy in the torso, as we find them to be annoying when we are wearing a pack or trying to look down at our feet when skiing or climbing. There's also the fact that they have more dead space that needs to be warmed up using your body heat. We are also very particular about the length of the sleeves, as well as the shape of the jacket through the shoulders and upper back and chest. Simply put, we want our jacket to be ready for any activity, and no matter what we are doing — ice climbing, skiing, scrambling — we are likely to be moving our arms about and sometimes swinging them over our head.

Some jackets have sleeves that are too short, causing them to ride up above our wrists when our arms are outstretched. Likewise, we found some the jackets to have constrictive fits around the shoulders, upper back, and chest that impede our freedom of movement, and affect the overall fit. Other areas that we paid attention to the fit were the collar, the hood, and the length of the hemline at our waist.

In particular, we loved how the sleeves were plenty long and the cut of the shoulders spacious enough for us to perform any conceivable movement without impingement. While it was big enough to layer beneath, the cut was also sleek enough not to impede our motion. For us, it fits very close to the body with virtually no dead space. We felt this fit perfectly complemented its lightweight design, as we most often wore it as a stand-alone jacket in cool weather, or as a close to the body warmth layer in frigid weather.

The Outdoor Research Transcendent Hoody was among a small handful of other jackets that also fit nicely , offering versatility and a wide range of movement. Regardless of whether you are hiking, alpine climbing, or skiing, when you are working hard you will likely get too hot to wear a down jacket. Except when the weather is frigid, or we are doing a lot of hanging out, we typically only wear our down jacket during breaks in the activity, and then take it off and stuff it in the top of the pack again before we get moving.

Since a down jacket typically spends so much time in the pack, it is important to consider how easy it is to compress and how small it is once fully packed up. It is worth noting that down is superior to synthetic insulation when considering compressibility. Every time you stuff a synthetic jacket away, the insulation breaks down and loses its heat retention capacity.

Down can handle many more compressions and expansions than synthetic insulation, and is also smaller when compressed and is lighter weight than synthetic materials. The down used in the construction of the jackets reviewed is high quality and resisted degradation throughout testing.

Consequently, the stratifying characteristic for this metric tended to be how small they were when compressed. The jackets with few features, lightweight fabric, and high fill-power down compressed the most, while the jackets with heavy and bulky face fabrics or low fill-power down tended to compress the least. Some jackets easily fit into one of their own pockets and could be zipped up with an attached clip-in loop.

Others included a dedicated lightweight stuff sack that lives in the breast pocket. Unfortunately, some of the jackets in this review did not have a specialized method of compression, and so to get them as small as possible, we rolled them up inside their hood.

Not surprisingly, the Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer Hooded was the highest scorer when considering compressibility. It is the thinnest and lightest weight of the jackets we tested, and its high fill-power down means that it easily stuffs into its pocket in a tiny little package that can be clipped and taken anywhere.

Despite offering the most warmth of any jacket we tested, the Arc'teryx Cerium LT Hoody also stuffs down extremely small, a testament to the fill-power down used inside. The only downside was that it uses a dedicated stuff sack rather than stuffing into its pocket, which adds a tiny bit of weight and bulk, not to mention the possibility of losing the stuff sack. A handful of other jackets, including the REI Co-op Magma , also stuff down pretty small in their own pockets.

With so many companies producing high-quality clothing, it often comes down to the little things that make all the difference when deciding on a jacket.

This means a zipper that out-performs another, pockets a few inches higher, or a hem a few inches lower might make or break your choice. We've tested plenty of jackets that got away with elastic instead of a drawcord in the hood with varying results.

However, only one attempted to do away with the drawcord at the waist, and we did not like this design. There are a few things that you can do without, but some features are essential. When testing for features, we first set out to identify each of the features present on a jacket, and then tested them intensively while wearing the jacket out in the field.

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